Write Fat Kids

To the person who found my blog by searching “should you use the word fat when writing children’s books”: Yes. Use the word “fat”. Use it as a descriptor. Use it positively. Say that a kid in the book is fat, along with everything else they are. I grew up reading books with skinny, heroicContinue reading “Write Fat Kids”

Happy Birthday, Harry Potter. You Have Problems, and I Still Love You

I’ve spent the last several years working hard to learn about social justice and how to use that knowledge to think critically about media. On some levels, it really sucks, because it means I can’t just simply enjoy something. Even if I don’t see the feminist, racial, queerphobic, or other issues with something on myContinue reading “Happy Birthday, Harry Potter. You Have Problems, and I Still Love You”

Trigger Warnings in Art and Academia

Last week, on the Facebook group for the literary citizenship class I took with the amazing Cathy Day, a conversation started about trigger warnings in writing and in a college setting. It quickly became clear that while many students were familiar with trigger warnings and would appreciate them, professors had, in many cases, never heardContinue reading “Trigger Warnings in Art and Academia”

Let’s Talk About Romanticized Abuse in Books

[Trigger warning for abusive relationships, both fictional and real] I recently got into a conversation on Twitter about Twilight. Right now, you’re probably having the same reaction I did – “People still talk about Twilight?” Apparently, yes, and I’m now convinced that at least part of the Twilight conversation is still important to have. That’sContinue reading “Let’s Talk About Romanticized Abuse in Books”

On Beauty and Body Diversity in YA

Yesterday, writer Taylor Breslin made a great post on Tumblr about some of her big frustrations in young adult fiction. The big topic? Stupid beauty standards and female confidence. It’s a great post, and you should go read it. It got me thinking and I want to expand on this a little and also connectContinue reading “On Beauty and Body Diversity in YA”